The Cottingley Fairies and the Bolshevik Revolution

A fairy tale in the most Biblical sense.

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The year 1917 was a big year for belief. Two young posh English cousins manage to fool the world with intellectual dishonesty. And a cabal of international financiers, the so-called “Bolsheviks,” managed to do the same thing to destroy Russia and sign the Balfour Declaration to create the mythical state of Israel. Two spectacular hoaxes.

The precocious English girls, Elsie Wright and Frances Griffiths, ages 16 and 9, borrowed a camera and came back to their parents with pictures where they can be seen playing with fairies. They became known as the Cottingley Fairies. Elsie and Frances carried out the tremendous hoax, convincing people they had taken photos of real fairies.

The Cottingley Fairies appear in a series of only five photographs by Elsie Wright and Frances Griffiths. The famous writer of Sherlock Holmes, Doyle wrote in a leading magazine of the pictures authenticity. And so, with popular distribution, and recognized approval of leaders of the day – the legend was set, and the fairytale became a reality. Doyle’s belief in the photos and fairies was so strong that he even wrote his own book to prove it.

It wasn't until the early 1980s that the ladies admitted the photographs were faked, using cardboard cutouts of fairies copied from a popular children’s book of the time. But because snooty Sir Arthur Conan Doyle interpreted them as visible evidence of fairies, an expert said they were real, the damage had been done, for decades. Once again, it wasn't until the early 1980s that they admitted the fairies were cardboard cutouts. This is a leitmotif in geopolitics. The British elite are grifters.

The Cottingley Fairies hoax and the Bolshevik Revolution was the exact transition point between centuries of folkloric traditional where fairies and things you would never have seen might be real and the digital age where anything you can actually see might not be real.

A small cabal of “revolutionaries” overthrew the Russian government and established the world's first Marxist state. The Russian Revolution consisted of two revolutions in 1917 that ended Tsarist rule and eventually replaced it with a communist state.

The first revolution was mainly centred in Petrograd (now St Petersburg) and overthrew Tsar Nicholas II. The second revolution was led by Vladimir Lenin and his Bolshevik party. It overthrew the provisional government and established communism.

The Soviet Union then existed for over 70 years. It was not until the 1980s that it and the hoax of the Cold War began to crack, as so the story goes. But the Bolshevik Revolution was no more real than the Cottingley Fairies. All these years later we know that revolutions never end authentically. There may have been some grass roots feeling among the Russian public in the beginning, but it was long gone by 1917.

I woke up this morning thinking about the Bolshevik press and how it instructed the masses and mobilized them to carry out the tasks set by the Communist Party. Like the period of the preparation and carrying out of the Bolshevik Revolution in Russia (February-October 1917).

Bolshevik organizations also systematically published fiction with accusatory and revolutionary content; such as novellas, stories, essays, plays, satirical tales, and revolutionary poems. The Bolshevik press had a large network of correspondents and professional revolutionaries.

Before October 1917 more than 60 Bolshevik newspapers and magazines were published in ten languages of the peoples of Russia; several were published in European languages. In addition to the periodical press, leaflets, pamphlets, and books were published.

“Journalism” has been a British military-intelligence strategy ever since 1917.

During the same period, in 1916-17, the UK and the U.S. together committed to create the state of Israel through the Balfour Declaration in London and President Wilson’s 14 points in Washington, DC. This was long before Hitler and the Holocaust happened.

In November 1917, the Bolshevik Revolution in Russia coincided with the Balfour Declaration in Britain. Bolsheviks (Zionists) in Russia and the British government committed to support a “national home for the Jewish people” in Palestine. This was long before Hitler and the Holocaust happened.

A fairy tale in the most Biblical sense.

The Bolshevik Revolution resulted in massive and genocidal religious persecutions against all religions in Russia, especially against the Orthodox Christian Church which was then practically decimated by Soviet terror squads. The Bolshevik Revolution was an enterprise of the British Empire carried out by a small suzerainty of Zionists.

The Cottingley Fairies made Sir Doyle a household name. Snooty Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was British. 

The year 1917, the year of the Cottingley Fairies hoax and the Bolshevik Revolution was the exact transition point between centuries of folkloric traditional where fairies and things you would never have seen might be real and the digital age where anything you can actually see might not be real.

The world of make-believe was transitioning in a revolutionary way. Hollywood in California was founded in 1910, and by 1917, many major motion-picture companies had relocated to Hollywood from the East Coast.

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